Who We Are

The American Aging Association was launched on October 19, 1970 and organized by a group of distinguished medical doctors and scientists who wanted a specific organization dedicated to aging research.  The Association is defined as a non-profit, tax-exempt national organization of lay and scientific members dedicated to:

  • Promote biomedical aging studies directed towards increasing the functional life span of humans with one goal being to slow the aging process.
  • Keep the public informed of the progress of aging research and of practical means of achieving a long and healthy life.
  • Increase knowledge of biogerontology among physicians and others in the health fields
  • Foster the scientific and professional career development of AGE trainees and scientific members. (added 2017)

The American Aging Association recognizes a crucial, compelling need to promote diversity in the aging research workforce. The American Aging Association is committed to fostering a diverse workforce in aging research, and to ensuring that people from all backgrounds can fully and productively participate in our field.

Why be a Member?

The American Aging Association fosters the scientific and professional career development of its members through scientific meetings, networking, mentorship, and financial support of trainees. Members have access to exclusive content, such as recorded seminars and Powerpoint slides, and have free access rights to the electronic content of the journal GeroScience.

 

Join Today

 


 

AGE Letter from the President

Holly Van Remmen, PhD, FAAA
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
AGE 2023 President

Dear Colleagues,

It seems not very long ago that we were all convened in San Antonio for an exciting annual meeting! Now I am pleased to announce that our plans for the 2023 meeting of the American Aging Association to be held next June 8-11 in Oklahoma City are well underway.  Read More>>


AGE 2023 Keynote Speaker

 

 

 

 

 

Arlan Richardson, PhD
OU Health Science Center

You Have Come A Long Way Baby: Five Decades of Research on the Biology of Aging from the Perspective of a Researcher Studying Aging.

Read More>>